Dynamic, Deconstructed Design

A project with a dynamic, deconstructed design, like the works of architecture of the visionary American talent. A component sofa, visually light, the result of the composition of specific volumes where Euclidean geometry is cast aside. The upholstered back is high and inclined, while the single soft cushion is trapezoidal in form, combined with a chaise longue element that also has an asymmetrical form.

Substantial Volume

The armrests are padded or in painted metal. Unusual angles and thicknesses, with no orthogonal joints, because the harmony comes from the balanced composition of the volumes. The ADAGIO Sofa brings together a synergy of architectural form and everyday comfort. ADAGIO means slow or at ease. The canted arms and back re-imagine the rigid structure of a traditional sofa creating more comfortable movement and a dynamic form.

Unlocking New Aethetic Codes

The materials and colors are inspired by classic Italian design. “The design celebrates the subtle details of the everyday form and the excellence of Italian craftsmanship,” said architect and designer Daniel Libeskind.he fertile collaboration between the designer and the company has generated a product that perfectly combines the architect’s philosophy of forceful, iconic forms with the idea of sober elegance that is an integral part of the company’s identity. The result is a product that emphasizes and reinforces the idea of comfort, introducing unusual new aesthetic codes.

Technical Info

Adagio sofa has a wooden frame, padded with polyurethane, and it is covered with a protective fabric lining. The seat cushions are made of polyurethane and dacron. The back cushions are down-filled and made of polyester fibre. The throw pillows can be down-filled (on request with upcharge). The feet are made of polished pvc. The upholstery contains removable fabric or leather covers.

  

Design By Daniel Libeskind

An international figure in architecture and urban design, the architect Daniel Libeskind is renowned for his ability to evoke cultural memory in buildings of equilibrium-defying contemporaneity. Informed by a deep commitment to music, philosophy, and literature, Mr. Libeskind aims to create architecture that is resonant, original, and sustainable. Born in Lód’z, Poland, in 1946, Mr. Libeskind immigrated to the United States as a teenager. Daniel Libeskind established his architectural studio in Berlin, Germany, in 1989 after winning the competition to build the Jewish Museum in Berlin. In February 2003, Studio Libeskind moved its headquarters from Berlin to New York City when Daniel Libeskind was selected as the master planner for the World Trade Center redevelopment. Daniel Libeskind’s practice is involved in designing and realizing a diverse array of urban, cultural and commercial projects internationally. The Studio has completed buildings that range from museums and concert halls to convention centers, university buildings, hotels, shopping centers and residential towers. As Principal Design Architect for Studio Libeskind , Mr. Libeskind speaks widely on the art of architecture in universities and professional summits. His architecture and ideas have been the subject of many articles and exhibitions, influencing the field of architecture and the development of cities and culture. Mr. Libeskind lives in New York with his wife and business partner, Nina Libeskind.